Dwarf Sagittaria

Also known as:
Awl-Leaf Arrowhead
Family:
Alismataceae
Origin:
North and South America

General description

Long submerged straplike leaves (50 cm long and 2.5 cm wide) which are spathulate on the ends where they float on the water surface. Emergent leaves are oval. Flowers (1cm diameter) with 3 white petals, yellow centre, usually just above the surface of the water.

In its native habitat, it occurs in shallow brackish waters near the coast. Especially common in areas that are exposed during low tides. Lakes and streams.

Locally spreads by runners. Seeds and rhizome fragments carried by water, wildlife, machinery. Potentially released when aquarium contents dumped.

Can from dense stands that may displace native species. It is less weedy and rarer than the other Sagittaria and Vallisneria species.

Site management

Recommended approaches

1. Mechanical removal at small sites.
2. For chemical control options contact the Auckland Council Biosecurity team.

Caution: when using any herbicide or pesticide PLEASE READ THE LABEL THOROUGHLY to ensure that all instructions and safety requirements are followed.

Similar species

eel grass - Lake Pupuke variety
Vallisneria australis

Vallisneria species never have floating leaves or conspicuous white flowers.

eel grass - Meola Creek variety
Vallisneria spiralis

Vallisneria species never have floating leaves or conspicuous white flowers.

Search tags

RPMS status

Total Control - Whole Region
dwarf sagittaria - Main species image